Posted in Art by June©Malone, calligraphy, card, cards, crayon, design, digital, drawing, fine art, greeting cards, illustration, ink, ink drawing, June Malone Art, June Malone, Illustrator, June©Malone, Mixed media, Painting, pen and ink, pencil, pencil drawing, posters, watercolour, watercolour illustration, Zazzle

Hello Zazzle, Goodbye Life!

Anyone who wants to make money by selling their art online, let me warn you that it is a deeply formidable task.

When I naively thought it would fun to open an online business little did I realise what I was letting myself in for. Every day sees me investing long hours on activities which do not include painting pretty pictures.  I’ve had to…..

  • Decipher what and how to adhere to the site requirements on setting up the store front.
  • Learn every damned thing alone as Zazzle don’t really offer much advice.
  • Interpret and complete complicated forms to keep the taxman happy.
  • Know what size images are required for each individual product.
  • Be proficient at using imaging software – I’m self-taught on Adobe Fireworks.
  • Think up original ideas.
  • Create new images, not just with paint and inks, but digitally as well.
  • Become a champion at tagging.
  • Delve deeply into my box of descriptive words.
  • Open promotional media sites such as Facebook and Pinterest.

Zazzle©Desk.fw

But still…all I hear is crickets.

It’s going to be a long time before I see any reward for my efforts and I’m realising that it will be necessary to open new stores with other online platforms in order to appeal to a variety of audiences.

The thing I’ve found the most difficult is to not be timid about pushing my Zazzle store on social media such as Facebook and Twitter.  It’s not enough to simply upload a few items and sit back waiting for them to sell.  Constant promotion of each item is vital and I’m convinced that I’ve probably irritated my friends and lost a good few followers in the process.

On the plus side, Zazzle do print my designs on good quality merchandise and I am enjoying the process; the novelty hasn’t worn off…yet.

I just saw an article proclaiming that those who succeed with these online stores have been doing it fo approximately fifteen years, (FIFTEEN!!) producing more than one item per day – I’ll probably be dead in fifteen years.

Well, much as I’d like to, I obviously can’t sit here chatting – got to get back to consistently and persistently producing for my Zazzle shop.

Author:

Creatively driven, allergic to mediocrity, open-minded, fairly well behaved and in a permanent state of re-invention.

6 thoughts on “Hello Zazzle, Goodbye Life!

  1. Ha! Welcome to my world! Someone told me once that craft businesses should be 90% promotion and 10% making the stuff, but I still feel that’s a bit extreme. I don’t pretend to be an expert, but you will find that setting it all up at the beginning takes ages but then all the steps take less time the next time you do them.
    Having bought some of your cards, I can vouch for what gorgeous products they are.

  2. I’m relieved that you like the cads you bought, it gave me a boost when I saw that purchases had been made. Thanks for trying to placate me but I’m aware of what lies ahead. Also, you’re a shining example as your business seems to be doing very well.

  3. I’m exhausted reading your post. You might as well open a brick and mortar store with the amount of work you are putting into this effort. I agree with Leslie. You are so brave. Good luck. And I do hope you’re still around in 15 years. I’d love to celebrate all the profits you’ve made in 2030!

  4. Haha! You DO make me laugh Carol. More like build myself a brick wall to bang my head against it some days. There’s often a bit of growling and sighing going on here and the challenge certainly exercises my brain. I had a good day today so not quitting yet. Thanks for the good wishes, I need them.

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